Friday, December 4, 2009

Day of Blogging for Justice: Ban Taser Torture


(See Updates below)


Over 50 taser murders have been documented this year. 21 of them were African-American men (despite being only 6% of the population, as Villager points out). Some may not see the power that a blog entry, or even a number of blog entries dedicated to raising awareness on behalf of public safety, may have in the end, but many of us know we would not enjoy the freedoms we often take for granted today had belief in change not been championed by those who came before us. Even something as informal as a blog can turn the light on where it's needed most; the collective mind. With enough voices blogging, vlogging and the like, word can spread, and in that sharing, the needed momentum can spark.

What is it that causes an officer who has taken an oath to uphold the law, to murder an innocent in cold blood? Is it the mismanagement of frustration that ends in anger-displacement? Is it the result of a long standing psychological issue such an officer has battled in secret, or most unacceptably, well in the awareness of their superiors?
Most importantly, how can we as citizens continue to allow psychologically unstable public servants to walk our streets wielding deadly weapons for use, in what seems to be many cases, in satiating a plainly-visible desire for power (possibly based in their own experiences as victims that were never properly healed within themselves)?

Can we afford the luxury of apathy, when we direly need to rise in a flood of voices demanding exact controls against this kind of injustice?
Can we really pretend away the terrorism taking place on our own streets within our own legal system, or will we perservere in demanding and successfully seeing the discontinuance of the use of tasers: lethal torture devices that have been used on pregnant women, elderly women, hearing impaired individuals, and individuals with epilepsy-wearing-their-medical-bracelets to name only a few very real horrific cases?

Sooner or later we have to face the facts regarding the abuses of our basic rights at the hands of those we're supposed to be able to trust, and in facing this fact we have to act to ensure they do not continue.

Please join the growing amount of voices calling for Congressional hearings on Taser Abuse.


Update:


From the Comments (share your thoughts. We don't have to agree. Dialogue is progress).


Blogger
Blogger Gunfighter said...

Last I heard, we make up approx. 13percent of the population... that changes the demographics a bit.

Truthfully, I have to object to your use of the term "Murder" to describe the unbintended deaths that sometimes happen when someone is TASED.


Last I heard, we make up approx. 13percent of the population... that changes the demographics a bit.

Truthfully, I have to object to your use of the term "Murder" to describe the unbintended deaths that sometimes happen when someone is TASED.

December 13, 2009 5:48 AM

Delete
Blogger PurpleZoe said...

Peace Gunfighter

I respect your right to object, brother. Freespeech is one of the most beautiful birthrights we have when it's not suppressed. I've personally witnessed power abuses by renegade officers however (one of them directed at a hispanic child under ten--- the officer tried to intimidate me when I spoke up against it).
I'm not being colorful with my writing when I say it's murder. In some (few) cases it may be an accident. I don't discount that it's not an easy job to protect and serve (with frustrations I can't even fathom), but the use of 'Force Continuum' is a regulation that hasn't been followed, on too many occasions.
I mean come on. Tasing elderly women, pregnant women, disabled men that obviously serve no threat? Cuff 'em and take them in. Why tase them? Why murder them? These are all true stories that I won't ignore or file under 'oops', except when there is indisputable proof an accident or tool malfunction has taken place.

Tasers need to be banned period and murder charges need to be filed when renegade officers abuse citizens they've been put in place to serve. Do all officers behave that way? Of course not. But let's not protect the ones that do. That's what I'm saying.
Let's not protect power-abusers that murder innocents and say oops.
Eventually we'll get to a place of true justice, but only when there's no special treatment for people placed in 'higher positions' when it comes to punishment, in my humble opinion.

Shine on and thx again for stopping through
-PZ

11 comments:

Villager said...

I just noticed that you have over 2200 Twitter followers ... that is remarkable!

Thank you for supporting today's effort to raise awareness about the taser-related deaths occurring all over the nation.

peace, Villager

Dazjae said...

Peace Villager *_^

Thankyou for hosting the Day of blogging. It's an honor to participate.

Shine on
-PZ

Eddie G. Griffin said...

Thanks also from Eddie Griffin, on behalf of the Michael Jacobs Jr. and Noah Lopez families of Fort Worth, Texas.

Dazjae said...

Peace Eddie *_^

It's an honor to participate. I hope to see a flood of voices in future efforts.

Shine on
-PZ

Gunfighter said...

Last I heard, we make up approx. 13percent of the population... that changes the demographics a bit.

Truthfully, I have to object to your use of the term "Murder" to describe the unbintended deaths that sometimes happen when someone is TASED.

PurpleZoe said...

Peace Gunfighter

I respect your right to object, brother. Freespeech is one of the most beautiful birthrights we have when it's not suppressed. I've personally witnessed power abuses by renegade officers however (one of them directed at a hispanic child under ten--- the officer tried to intimidate me when I spoke up against it).
I'm not being colorful with my writing when I say it's murder. In some (few) cases it may be an accident. I don't discount that it's not an easy job to protect and serve (with frustrations I can't even fathom), but the use of 'Force Continuum' is a regulation that hasn't been followed, on too many occasions.
I mean come on. Tasing elderly women, pregnant women, disabled men that obviously serve no threat? Cuff 'em and take them in. Why tase them? Why murder them? These are all true stories that I won't ignore or file under 'oops', except when there is indisputable proof an accident or tool malfunction has taken place.

Tasers need to be banned period and murder charges need to be filed when renegade officers abuse citizens they've been put in place to serve. Do all officers behave that way? Of course not. But let's not protect the ones that do. That's what I'm saying.
Let's not protect power-abusers that murder innocents and say oops.
Eventually we'll get to a place of true justice, but only when there's no special treatment for people placed in 'higher positions' when it comes to punishment, in my humble opinion.

Shine on and thx again for stopping through
-PZ

Gunfighter said...

you'll never hear me say that some of my fellow officers have never done anything wrong,. Likewise, you'll never hear me say that cops are perfect, but Iam a professional use of force instructor, and I am here to tell you that most TASER use by cops is perfectly legitimate. Further, the TASER is a useful too in subduing suspects that might otherwise have been shot or beaten with a steel baton.

I've been TASED, as an instructor, I have to do it. It hurts. It hurts alot... which is the point, to make a suspect stop doing whatever it is that caused you to TASE them in the first place.

Leaving that aside, I have to point out to you that the "Use of Force Continuum" isn't a law or regulation. It is a training tool... and an outdated one at that. You won't find that many agencies (with any hint of a decent training repputation) that still uses them. The reason for this manifests itself in the anti-Taser debates. Many people assume that a police officer has to exhaust all lesser force options before picking a force option that is higher on the list of potential force options. This simply isn't true.

Deadly force is defined as "any force that is likely to cause death or serious physical injury"

TASERS are no more likely... and indeed are less likely to cause death or serious physical injury to a person than a beating with a steel baton.

There's more, but I don't want to manipulate your blog.

I'll be visiting again.

Peace be with you.

PurpleZoe said...

Peace

You're not manipulating my blog. Feel free to post comments as long as they flow. That's what it's here for. Information exchange is appreciated.

My focus in this post is toward renegade officers, point-blank. They exist. Whether wielding a taser or baton. From the examples I've seen and read about, the taser was often pulled out with no threat extended in the slightest by the victim.
With this blogging day of justice post being focused on tasers, that's where I placed my focus, but I'm against the abuse of citizens whether it's exacted with a taser, a steel baton, gun, and etc.

The issue I take is with the abuse of power. It happens too often. That needs to be corrected. Legislation sorely needs to be introduced to ensure it.

Shine on
-PZ

PurpleZoe said...

@Gunfighter

P.S. I appreciate the info about the Force of Use Continuum. It should be legislation. I appreciated being educated that it isn't yet. I'm gonna kick it with some of the other Day of Justice Bloggers about that. It might be something that needs a separate petition.

Shine on
-PZ

Gunfighter said...

Legislating a use of force continuum would be nearly impossible. The laws regarding the use of force (in general) by police have been codified by Graham v. Connor, and deadly force by police in Tennessee v. Garner.

As for the "renegade" officer... you will always have them. We can (and do)try as best we can to eliminate them, but we will always have them. Just like murderers, pedophiles, terrorists, and politicians.

PurpleZoe said...

Greetings,

I'm of the (oft-considered) naive souls who believe in the impossible, especially where justice is concerned. Quite a few things once considered impossible have come to pass for the betterment of society.
I wholeheartedly believe in the possibility of societal ills being rehabilitated/metamorphosed, so I can't agree that there will always be rogue officers who spit on their oath to serve and protect (especially in the alarming amount their seem to presently be), or extremely debased criminals. We might even see politicians fade out in favor of true leaders.
These problems are often systemic ills. Getting to the root of the problem can work wonders for the 'condition'.
If I believed otherwise, speaking out, and protesting/fighting injustice would have no purpose. Likewise, if that were a largely accepted line of thought this blog and blogs like it wouldn't exist, and those who've come before present-day activists would have given up on fighting for the freedoms we enjoy today.
Where there's a will there's always a way.

Peace & HighThought
-PZ